Dan Blakeslee and Hoot & Holler

Dan Blakeslee and Hoot & Holler

  • Americana
  • Folk
  • Roots
  • Singer/Songwriter

Dan Blakeslee

  • Folk
  • Singer/Songwriter

With a suitcase of songs, Maine folk troubadour Dan Blakeslee ventured into the subways of Boston in 1995 to practice his craft.

He has been making music and art throughout New England ever since, leading him to tour the U.S. performing with The Low Anthem, David Wax Museum, Lydia Loveless, The Lumineers, Liam Finn, Brown Bird, Joe Fletcher, Death Vessel and Kimya Dawson among others. In 2015 his dream of playing Newport Folk Festival became a reality, the location where Bob Dylan went electric 50 years earlier. Blakeslee is unafraid to bare his very soul on stage, emptying a loaded cache of emotion and passion onto the stage for all to witness, explore and devour.

Hoot & Holler

  • Americana
  • Roots

In early 2013, a mutual love of American folk music brought Amy Alvey (fiddle, guitar) and Mark Kilianski (guitar, banjo) together.

They call themselves Hoot and Holler as a nod to the “hootenanny” song gatherings during the folk revival of the 1960s, while also hinting at the infectious energy that occurs during a barn dance in the south. After cutting their teeth in Boston’s burgeoning roots music scene for two and a half years, they could not help but heed the call of the open road, and spent the better part of 2016 touring nationally while living in their camper van “Irene”. Ever inspired by the enduring spirit of traditional Appalachian mountain music, they now call Asheville, North Carolina their home. Fans of tight duo harmonies will love the tender harmonizing between Amy and Mark that falls in line with masters like Gillian Welch and Dave Rawlings. Both are Berklee College of Music alumni, and the listener can expect the polished technique of conservatory training, in tandem with the grit, drive, and soul of musicians like Bill Monroe or Ola Belle Reed. Their new full-length album “Reasons To Run” plays like a sonic cross-country road trip. The album starts off with a cajun groove harkening to the Louisiana swamps, while “Too Many Reasons To Run” was inspired by the sparse beauty of the Southwestern desert. With other geographical references to Virginia, New Orleans, and Kentucky, Hoot and Holler invite you to experience their soundscapes.

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